REBECCA TALKS WINE WITH STEPH AND DOM

I think the producer at TalkRADIO was having a bit of a snigger over this week’s challenge – what wine to drink with a Greggs’ sausage roll?

I had high expectations for this blasphemous sausage roll, that pushed Jesus out of the Nativity crib. As sausage rolls go, Greggs’ looks right and proper, but the pastry could be more flakey and the filling could pack more of flavour punch for our taste buds. Dedicated to the cause, we set out to find a wine to make Gregg’s sausage rolls taste splendid.

The Wine Society’s Saumur Rosé Brut, Gratien et Meyer, £10.95

Our first bottle hit the bull’s eye and Steph loved it! We all loved it, even Greggs’ sausage roll loved it.  ‘Greggs should be selling this in its stores!’ Steph snorted. We all agreed. The gorgeous rose petal pink, we decided was the perfect pink for a piggy roll. Sniff, sniff, the creamy bubbles propel wonderful scents of raspberries and cherries and whish away any stodgy pastry. The wine and sausage roll embrace, this could be the start of a something big.

Gratien et Meyer, established in 1864, one of Saumur’s best producers. The wine is made just like Champagne, or méthode traditionelle, but from Cabernet Franc and a dash of local Grolleau.

Greggs Bakery established in 1939, is the largest bakery chain in the United Kingdom.

Sainsbury’s Taste the Difference, Awatere Valley, Marlborough Riesling, 2016, by Yealands, £8

Bottle number two would have been brilliant with some green lipped mussels, it’s all limes and sea pebble minerality, but the wine picked a fight with the pastry, surprisingly disastrous as the wine has a residual sugar of 8g/l. Drink and learn.

REDS ON A BUDGET

Drinking wine for those us on a tight budget, is getting harder and harder. So I brought along two fab reds from the Douro (the home of Port and budget reds with character). Expect big, fat, dark berry flavours, but with a salty, savoury edge too. I chose one oak-free and one with oak to see how they would fair with Greggs’ sausage rolls.

Amius Douro, Portugal, £4.99, Aldi

Bottle three was unoaked, sweeter (9g/l), softer textured and easy to drink even without food. It was perfectly acceptable with a sausage roll, but not a patch on the Saumur. I can also vouch its compatibility with pasta.

Gloria, Douro Reserve, 2014, £6.99, Aldi 

Bottle four was drier (2g/l) and fragrantly oaked with 12 months in barrel. As expected, it was too tannic for the sausage roll, flavours collided and the wine seemed bitter.  Definitely, a wine for roast lamb, a juicy rib-eye or a herby sausage – without the roll.